Dissertation Acknowledgments

My dissertation acknowledgments are reproduced verbatim below.

As Bach appended to his scores: Soli deo gloria.

Thank you to my wife Barbara, who was on board with this whole dissertation thing since day one. You have been an unfailing encouragement and support through this process, even as work hours got longer and longer. I love you.

Thanks also to Samuel Hazelwood Carradini, who came along right at the tail end of the dissertation process and more than once inspired me to keep writing.

Thank you to all of my respondents, without whom this dissertation would have no data. I am deeply indebted to your generosity in giving up time out of your life to answer my questions. In your honor, I have tried to respond and will respond to pretty much every request for research interview I get. Kara Dahl Russell was a participant in this study; she asked to be named.

Thank you also to the many people who recommended potential respondents at the beginning of this study.

Thank you to Jason Swarts, who guided me through the CRDM program and continually pushed me to write more clearly and concisely. I am deeply thankful for all the work you put in to turn “I like music and writing” into a dissertation and research trajectory.

Thank you to Carolyn Miller, who took me on as an RA and joined my committee even as she was retiring. I learned an incredible amount during the year we worked together.

Thank you to Melissa Johnson, who helped me develop the conference proceedings paper that became my first publication. Thank you for your help in the courses I took from you and in the dissertation process.

Thank you to Gary Beckman, who introduced me to Arts Entrepreneurship. Thank you for introducing me to the ideas of Arts Entrepreneurship, but even more, the people of Arts Entrepreneurship. This interdisciplinary dissertation would not exist without your help and the knowledge I gleaned from the SAEE community’s three conferences.

Thank you to Stacey Pigg and Victoria Gallagher, who wrote me letters in the job search process and contributed to this dissertation through good conversation and helpful advice.

Thank you to Gwendolynne Reid and Cristiane Damasceno, who met with me weekly for mutual support, encouragement, problem-solving, accountability, and conversation. Our weekly meetings were hugely helpful in staying on target.

Thanks to the rest of my cohort, with whom I spent many hours poring over theory and practice: Danisha Baker-Whitaker, Jason Buel, Jason Carabelli, Karl Feld, Adele Hite, Will Sink, J.J. Sylvia, and Dwiyatha Widinugraha.

Thank you to Dad, Mom, Joe, John, and Grandma Carradini for encouraging me over and over through this entire process, and especially at the end of the thing. Thanks especially to John for sending gifs, memes, weird academic journal articles, and outrageous news articles as conversation starters. You da real MVP.

Thank you to Chris Krycho, who fielded my many frustrations and fears with admirable grace in our Slack chat. You are the best friend I could ask for.

Thank you to B. Burns, who has gone through the master’s and doctoral process alongside me. I couldn’t ask for a better friend and commiserating partner.

Thank you to Kati Fargo Ahern, who mentored me through the job searching process.

Thank you to IVGCF at NCSU, the members of which were a consistent, weekly source of academic, personal, spiritual, and emotional support from the first week I arrived in Raleigh. Special thanks to Jeff Miller, who picked me up from the airport more than a few times from late-night conference flights.

Thank you to Clay Spinuzzi, whose name appears more than 60 times in this dissertation. I like his work a lot.

Thank you to everyone in the CRDM who talked with me when I was taking breaks from dissertation writing. Special thanks in this arena go to Max Renner, Steven Smith, Katreena Alder, Mai Xiong, Krystin Gollihue, Melissa Adams, Sarah Evans, Josh Jackson, Keon Pettiway, Chen Chen, Justin Grandinetti, and Mark Bentley.

Thank you to Larry Rosebure, who has given me solid life advice since I was 17 years old and also stopped me from quitting grad school once.

Thank you to Jared Peterson and Duane Davis, who gave me solid life advice over and over.

Thank you to Jeff Hinton for always answering my phone calls and geeking out with me. May we all be irrationally confident.

Thank you to Kevin Graybeal, who did video game days with me. (Thank you again to Barbara, who let those happen.)

Thank you to the people of Christ the King Presbyterian and Renewal Presbyterian, for being my community.

Thank you to Derek Ross, Stewart Whittemore, Chad Wickman, Susan Youngblood, Jo Mackiewicz, Isabelle Thompson, and Michelle Sidler, who cultivated the original germs of these thoughts in my time at Auburn University. Special thanks to Michelle Sidler, who guided the first project I did on musicians’ professional communication.

Thank you to Bob Klein, who continually regulated the temperature of my writing space.

Thank you to the student who 3-D printed me an owl that I named Steev; Steev was my constant companion during the writing process.

Thank you to the good people at Global Village Coffee, Jubala Coffee, and Bruegger’s Bagels, for providing the coffee that fueled the writing of this dissertation.

Thank you to Peter Gade, who told me as a freshman to not drink coffee until I needed it. Ten years later, I needed it, Dr. Gade. And it worked.

Beyond these, there are so many more people who helped out in ways large and small throughout the process. Thank you to everyone who was a part of this last four years.

I would like to thank the following musicians for the works I listened to repeatedly while I wrote this dissertation:

John Luther Adams (Become Ocean)

Teen Daze (Soundcloud stream)

Jerome Van Voen (Simeon Ten Holt’s “Canto Ostinato”)

Joep Franssen (“Harmony of the Spheres”)

Russian Circles (discography)

Ulrich Schnauss (discography)

Delta-Notch (8 Hour Study Mix: “Trance to Study By: All-Nighter”)

DJ Ekki (various mixes)

Thank you also to WCPE (The Classical Station), which I also listened to quite a bit.

I’d like to thank the fictional characters whose exploits helped me relax during the process: Finn the Human, Jake the Dog, Shepherd Shepherd, Steven Universe, Greg Universe, Sutton, the Monado, Duane (the FFVII version of him), the Crystal Gems, Darth Revan, Tim, and the crew of the U.S.S. Voyager. I’d also like to thank the Great British Baking Show and Fixer Upper, which were the least stressful things I could find to watch at the very tail end of the dissertation.

I’d like to thank the following inanimate objects and their oft-nameless creators: Microsoft Notepad, Inkpad Notepad, Microsoft Excel, MAXQDA (and the product’s eminently reasonable support staff), ANTCONC (shoutout to Laurence Anthony), the Internet, coffee, magnetic poetry, the CRDM office building, the CIRCUIT Lab, Pilot pens, and actor-network theory, who would give these inanimate objects thankable agency and whose theories almost featured in this dissertation.

Finally, thanks to Relient K, whose The Anatomy of the Tongue in Cheek started this quest for me 16 years ago.